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Godzilla King of the Monsters ad

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BIO:[]

From 1977 through 1979, Godzilla starred in a 24-issue run of comics written by Doug Moench, drawn by Herb Trimpe, and published by Marvel Comics entitled Godzilla, King of the Monsters. The series thrusts Godzilla completely into the Marvel Universe. In a nod to King Kong vs. Godzilla, Godzilla first appears by exploding out of an iceberg near Alaska; although, how the prehistoric creature came to be trapped again in ice is never revealed. Over the course of the series, he crosses the continental United States and eventually ends up in New York City.

Godzilla's appearances in the Toho films are alluded to in a few issues. In at least one issue, Godzilla seems like the lesser of two evils. He clashes with a monster far more evil, who generally acts more like an actual animal, albeit one with unusual levels of intelligence. Despite such allusions to the films, Godzilla is depicted as more animal-like than as the highly intelligent, perhaps sentient, creature depicted in the majority of the films by the time of the comics' printing (1977), in what is considered the Showa period of Godzilla films (1954–75). This version of Godzilla, while intelligent, is not the protector of mankind; however, he does, at times, exhibit compassion for human characters such as "Dum Dum" Dugan, the S.H.I.E.L.D. agent who is tasked with his capture, destruction, or repulsion from America, and Robert Takiguchi, the grandson of Japanese scientific expert Dr. Yuriko Takiguchi, who regards Godzilla as a hero and who is depicted as being Godzilla's only friend. Unlike other characters whose actions, thoughts, and feelings are told through thought balloons, Godzilla's are narrated externally via captions.

Godzilla encounters not only agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. during the course of the series but many other heroes in the Marvel Comics universe. Among them are the now-defunct group the Champions (sans Ghost Rider, though he was a member at the time), the Fantastic Four, Devil Dinosaur, Moon-Boy, and the Avengers, along with a brief cameo by Spider-Man in the last issue of the series.

Godzilla also fights other gigantic monsters, including Yetrigar, a King Kong-esque giant primate, and the alien Mega Monsters. Red Ronin, a giant robotic entity created specifically for the series, reappears in Avengers, Solo Avengers, and an issue of Wolverine, in which Godzilla is given an oblique nod, being referred to as a "Time Lost Dinosaur," presumably to avoid legal action by Toho. Marvel had, by then, lost the rights to depict Godzilla. Red Ronin also appears in the series Earth X. Godzilla, Yetrigar and Red Ronin participate in a three-way brawl in the Grand Canyon. From Godzilla King of the Monsters #11. (June 1978). Published by Marvel Comics. Art by Herb Trimpe and Ernie Chan.Between February 1979 and July 1979, Marvel had the comic book rights to both Godzilla and the Shogun Warriors. While the characters never crossed paths in their respective comics, artist Herb Trimpe (who did the artwork for both of the series) drew a variation of Godzilla and Rodan alongside Daimos, Great Mazinger, Raydeen, and Gaiking on the top page of a comic book ad soliciting the Shogun Warrior toys. Mattel Toys (who had the license to the Shogun Warriors) also had the licence to produce toys based on Godzilla and Rodan at this time. Also around this time, Marvel had prepared another story featuring Godzilla where he would have battled Dragon Lord. But since the copyright had expired, they modified Godzilla into a dragon like creature named The Wani for a story published in Marvel Spotlight vol. 2 #5 (March 1980).

Despite the loss of copyright, Marvel would continue to use Godzilla for several years afterward. In Iron Man No. 193, one of Godzilla's primary antagonists from the original series, mad scientist Doctor Demonicus, captures and mutates Godzilla so that he no longer resembles his Toho namesake. This altered version of the monster would appear in Iron Man #193 and would return in No. 194, and #196. His last appearance was in The Thing No. 31, where he is actually referred to as Godzilla.

Outside of this, Godzilla has been referenced or spoofed in other Marvel comics. In The Web of Spider-Man Annual No. 2 from 1986, the character Warlock from The New Mutants turned into Godzilla and then King Kong during a rampage through New York City. In The New Mutants Annual No. 3 in 1987, the Impossible Man turns into Godzilla during a battle with Warlock who turns into Red Ronin. In The Amazing Spider-Man No. 413 from 1996, Spider-Man battles a huge robot toy Godzilla (among other giant robotic toys) brought about by the villain Mysterio.  In the opening issue of The Mighty Avengers from 2007, a creature bearing a resemblance to the Heisei (1980s and '90s) Godzilla, appears alongside other giant monsters sent to attack the surface world by the Mole Man. When this issue was solicted in Marvel Previews via a sneak peek page, the creature had Godzilla's distinctive dorsal spines. But when the actual comic was published, the dorsal spines had been removed. Godzilla is also mentioned in the 2005 one shot comic Marvel Monsters: From the Files of Ulysses Bloodstone and the Monster Hunters. In Astonishing X-Men No. 36 (which was published in 2011), the monster Fin Fang Foom is rampaging through downtown Tokyo. In one panel, he passes by a building that has a Godzilla billboard on its roof.

The Marvel Comics atlas (under the article on Japan) states that the Age of Monsters began in 1954, which is evidently a reference to the original Godzilla film. Additionally, the entry mentions that Godzilla returns years later and is the reason for the construction of Red Ronin and the formation of S.H.I.E.L.D.'s Godzilla Squadron. S.H.I.E.L.D.'s Godzilla-hunting ship, Behemoth, has recently resurfaced under the command of Amadeus Cho in The Incredible Hercules #115. Yuriko Takiguchi, too, has reappeared in recent years, having been recruited by Beast to join his X-Club in Uncanny X-Men #506. Another monster resembling Godzilla served as the "self-destruct event" for Takiguchi's lab on Kunashir Island.

In 2006, Marvel reprinted the entire 24 issue run of Godzilla, King of the Monsters as a tradepaperback collection called Essential Godzilla, King of the Monsters. Like all of Marvel's Essential line, the series was published in black and white rather than color like in its original printing. 

GODZILLA COMIC BOOK SERIES COVERS:[]

GODZILLA VS SHOGUN WARRIORS:[]

TOY ADD WITH GODZILLA

toy ad with Shogun Warriors and Godzilla

 Between February 1979 and July 1979, Marvel had the comic book rights to both Godzilla and the Shogun Warriors. While the characters never crossed paths in their respective comics, artist Herb Trimpe (who did the artwork for both of the series) drew a variation of Godzilla and Rodan alongside Daimos, Great Mazinger, Raydeen, and Gaiking on the top page of a comic book ad soliciting the Shogun Warrior toys. Mattel, which had the license to the Shogun Warriors, also had the licence to produce toys based on Godzilla, and Rodan at this time.

Though he never appeared in the Shogun Warriors comic series, Red Ronin, a robot created for Marvel's Godzilla comic book series, was mentioned occasionally and was frequently written about in the letters pages.




SHOGUN WARRIORS VS GODZILLA TOY COMMERICALS:[]

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Shogun Warrior vs Godzilla Commercial 1970's-0

Shogun_Warriors_Godzilla_Toy_Commercial

Shogun Warriors Godzilla Toy Commercial

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